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CHC30113 Certificate III in Early Childhood Education and Care
CHCECE009 Use an approved learning framework
Student Name: XXXXXX
Student Number: XXXXXX
Assessment Number: 31842B/02
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File naming
Once you feel confident that you have covered the learning materials for this unit, you are ready to attempt this assessment. 
To help Open Colleges manage your assessment, please use the following file-naming convention when you save your Microsoft Word document. Your file should be named and saved to your computer’s hard drive using your:
student number_assessment_assessment number.doc
For example: 12345678_Use an approved learning framework_31842B_02
Assessment submission
When you are ready to submit your assessments, upload the files in OpenSpace using the Assessment Upload links in the relevant module of your course. If you need further assistance, the Student Lounge provides a ‘Quick Guide to Uploading Assessments’. Uploading assessments in OpenSpace will enable Open Colleges to provide you with the fastest feedback and grading for your assessment.

It is important that you keep a copy of all assessments submitted to Open Colleges.

Getting started
The assessment activities in this booklet have been designed to allow you to provide evidence that demonstrates your competence in the unit CHCECE009 Use an approved learning framework.
Your trainer will:
answer any questions that you might have about the assessment
assess your competence, as required by the unit of competency, by making judgments about the evidence you have presented in line with the rules of evidence: validity, authenticity, currency and sufficiency
provide feedback on the outcomes of the assessment process.

Introduction
You are required to complete two assessment tasks for CHCECE009 Use an approved learning framework.
In completing the final assessments, you will show evidence of your ability to:
identify learning frameworks
apply the learning framework.

Assessment number Assessment deliverables
31842B/01 Online quiz
31842B/02 Written assessment

31842B/02 Written Assessment
This written assessment task is in two parts.

You are required to complete each part.
Part A – Identify learning frameworks
Student instructions
For this assessment task, you are required to access and refer to the Early Years Learning Framework and one other approved framework of your choice. These frameworks were identified in the learning for this Unit of Competency and can be accessed online. You will be required to review both frameworks to identify similarities and differences between them.
Use the framework documents, or related website, to answer the questions in the table below. Answers may be in point form.

Early Years Learning Framework (EYLF) An approved learning framework of your choice – e.g. Framework for School Age Care in Australia.

What are the primary goals of each framework?
Belonging – is the basis for living a fulfilling life. Children feel they belong because of therelationships they have with their family, community, culture and place.Being – is about living here and now. Childhood is a special time in life and children needtime to just ‘be’ – time to play, try new things and have fun.Becoming – is about the learning and development that young children experience.Children start to form their sense of identify from an early age, which shapes the type ofadult they will become. The Early Years Learning Framework has a strong emphasis on play-based learning as this is the best vehicle for young children’s learning and the most appropriate stimulus for brain development. The framework also recognises the importance of communication and language (including early literacy and numeracy) and social and emotional development. Framework selected:
My time, Our Place
Primary goals of this framework:
Framework for School Age Care in Australia is designed to inform the development of a program that enhances school age children’s experiences and development through planned leisure activities. This framework aligns with the Early Years Learning Framework and supports children to transition from early childhood to school age services. It focuses on outcomes for children attending a quality school age care service and suggests the type of experiences that are offered to achieve these outcomes
In broad terms, what do the frameworks say about the value of quality education and care for children? The Early Years Learning Framework has a strong emphasis on play-based learning. The framework also recognises the importance of communication and language (including early literacy and numeracy) and social and emotional development. In addition, the framework has a focus on successful transition to formal schooling.My Time, Our Place in school age care settings teachers collaborate with children to provide play and leisure opportunities that are meaningful to children and support their wellbeing, learning and development. The Framework aims to extend and enrich children’s wellbeing and development in school age care settings.

Are there any identified learning outcomes for children? If so, what are they? Outcome 1: Children have a strong sense of identity
Outcome 2: Children are connected with and contribute to their world
Outcome 3: Children have a strong sense of wellbeing
Outcome 4: Children are confident and involved learnersOutcome 5: Children are effective communicators
Outcome 1:
• Children feel safe, secure, and supported
• Children develop their emerging autonomy, inter-dependence, resilience and sense of agency
• Children develop knowledgeable and confident self-identities
• Children learn to interact in relation to others with care, empathy and respect
Outcome 2:
• Children develop a sense of belonging to groups and communities and an understanding of the reciprocal rights and responsibilities necessary for active community participation
• Children respond to diversity with respect
• Children become aware of fairness
• Children become socially responsible and show respect for the environment
Outcome 3:
• Children become strong in their social and emotional wellbeing
• Children take increasing responsibility for their own health and physical wellbeing
Outcome 4:
• Children develop dispositions for learning such as curiosity, cooperation, confidence, creativity, commitment, enthusiasm, persistence, imagination and reflexivity
• Children develop a range of skills and processes such as problem solving, enquiry, experimentation, hypothesising, researching and investigating
• Children transfer and adapt what they have learned from one context to another
• Children resource their own learning through connecting with people, place, technologies and natural and processed materials
Outcome 5:
• Children interact verbally and non-verbally with others for a range of purposes
• Children engage with a range of texts and gain meaning from these texts
• Children express ideas and make meaning using a range of media
• Children begin to understand how symbols and pattern systems work
• Children use information and communication technologies to access information, investigate ideas and represent their thinking
What is the role of the educator in implementing the frameworks? As teachers we can employ strategies such as guiding, facilitating, scaffolding, supporting and co-constructing to direct children toward outcomes for learning. Being intentional with what, how and why we teach requires careful consideration on how content for learning is shaped between adult-guided and child-initiated learning experiences.

How can the frameworks assist educators in designing a curriculum?
Planning is a dynamic and ongoing process that involves working in partnership with children and families. Consult with children and families on an on-going basis will make for effective planning that begins with the gathering of rich information about children, families, community as it will open opportunities and experiences to support play and learning of the children.

Who are the key participants involved in implementing the framework?
Planning and documenting of the children’s play and learning is an important part of our professional role. Using our assessments of children’s learning this provides us with the tools to create a meaningful and responsive curriculum for children. It also enables us to make children’s learning visible and show evidence of what and how we can promote the children’s learning and development.

Part B – Apply learning frameworks
On completing Part A of this assessment task, answer the following two questions about applying the learning frameworks to practice.

How do you plan to work closely with others and under supervision to help implement an approved learning framework? Alternatively, if you are working in an early childhood setting, briefly explain how you already go about this.

When educators work effectively together as a team that they can create quality experiences and environments for children. The frameworks demand that educators are thoughtful and purposeful in what they do. To use their knowledge, experience and ability to apply the service philosophy to guide their decision making so that children have the best possible opportunities.

Briefly outline, in the following table, how you would (or do) apply outcomes of the Early Years Learning Framework to all aspects of your role as an educator.
Learning Outcomes Provide examples of practice that show how you would (or do) apply the outcomes of the EYLF in your role as an educator.

Outcome 1: Children have a strong sense of identity 3-12 months: Self settling and Transitioning into child care and developing attachments and trust Quiet mat time, Learning Portfolios, own writing books, photos, looking in the mirror, commencing holding own bottle, food, comforter etc.

1 year old: Dress ups, role playing/home corner, dolls and books
2-year-old: Dress ups, role playing/home corner, learning portfolio’s, about me sheets, photos
3-4 years old: Dress ups, role playing/home corner, learning portfolio’s, about me sheets, photos, languages, visitors to the centre, dolls and books, home corner food and cooking activities
Outcome 2: Children are connected with and contribute to their world 3-12 months: Sensory Garden, Centre pets, Rattles and shakers and Teething toys, meal times, multicultural music
1 years old: Learning Portfolios, photos, Sensory Garden
2-year-old: Vegetable gardens, centre pets, Sensory Garden
3-4 years old: Vegetable gardens, centre pets, Sensory Garden, learning stations – home corner, drawing table, quiet mat
Outcome 3: Children have a strong sense of wellbeing 3-12 months: Meal times, Outdoor Play, pulling up to standing position and Confidence to walk and use of standing frame, Healthy eating pyramid, Tummy time and Crawling/ rocking, Gross motor–big movement
1-year-old: Meal times, Vegetable patch, self-help skills, toileting, gross motor – big movements, healthy eating pyramid
2-year-old: Meal times, kind of dance and dancing, self-help skills, dressing and putting on own shoes and toileting, gross motor – big movements, healthy eating pyramid
3-4 years old: Meal times, kind of dance and dancing, stretching and movement, self-help skills, dressing and putting on own shoes and toileting, gross motor – big movements, healthy eating pyramid
Outcome 4: Children are confident and involved learners 3-12 months: Sharing and turn taking, encourage group participation, drawing, painting, play dough, Collage, Bead frames, balls, Stacking cups and blocks, Pegs and peg boards and shape-o, shape fitting and matching, Messy play
1-year-old: Sharing and turn taking, encourage group participation, visitors to the centre, centre pets, drawing, painting, play dough, Collage, puzzles – large and small, Pegs and peg boards and shape-o, shape fitting and matching, train sets, road sets, duplo, science experiments, Messy play, home corner, quiet mat
2-year-old: Dolls and books, visitors to the centre, centre pets, drawing, painting, play dough, Collage, puzzles – large and small, Pegs and peg boards and shape-o, shape fitting and matching, train sets, road sets, duplo, science experiments, Messy play, home corner, quiet mat, pattern following
3-4 years old: Dolls and books, visitors to the centre, centre pets, drawing, painting, play dough, Collage, puzzles – large and small, Pegs and peg boards, fitting and matching, train sets, road sets, duplo, science experiments, Messy play, home corner, quiet mat, pattern following
Outcome 5: Children are effective communicators 3-12 months: Expressing needs for comfort and attention, mimicking sounds and Started Prompting of words, Listening to repetitive songs/books, Confidence to play on own near peers
1-year-old: “Stop, I don’t like it” empowerment, flash cards, listening to repetitive books and songs
2-year-old: “Stop, I don’t like it” empowerment, flash cards, listening to repetitive books and songs sharing and turn taking, encouraging group participation
3-year-old: “Stop, I don’t like it” empowerment, flash cards, listening to repetitive books and songs sharing and turn taking, encouraging group participation, computer-based activities, making and creating, trains etc., road sets and duplo, science experiments, messy play and magnetic play
4-year-old: “Stop, I don’t like it” empowerment, flash cards, listening to repetitive books and songs sharing and turn taking, encouraging group participation, computer-based activities, making and creating, trains sets, road sets and duplo, science experiments, messy play and magnetic play, readers, first stories and dot to dots

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