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Prior to the lesson, I will usually have a discussion with the class teacher about what is going to be taught. At the start of the lesson the teacher identifies the learning objective (WALT) and pupils are made aware of what they should know by the end of the lesson. It is extremely important that I am aware myself of the success criteria of the activity so this can be shared with the pupils in a way they understand. By making unsure learners aware of the WALT the learners can keep on task if they keep relating their work to the aim throughout the activity. Additionally, notifying the pupils on how they will be assessed helps them take responsibility for their own learning.

When the children arrive in the morning, they usually begin their next steps from the work which they had completed previously. I then circulate around the class and support children who need assistance with their next steps and mark them. Marking the next steps allows me to have a better understanding of what the children understand or what they may require further support with. If I am confident that a child has grasped the concept, I will then set them additional tasks to advance their knowledge further.
Additionally, I use my observations from teaching and learning in class to support and develop the children.

b) Using challenge cards in Literacy related to the learning activity, I give children feedback using clear language and examples if necessary (particularly SEN children). Providing them with examples allows them to understand the learning objective better. At this point, I allow the child to carry out the work independently, providing further support if required.
Using previous feedback, the teacher collates pupils with the same ability and personalised learning goals so that their needs can be tailored as a group and they can work together with me either within the classroom or in a separate room.
For example, a group of children struggled to grasp the concept of fronted adverbials, so I was asked by the teacher to take out a group of children and discuss this with them using clear examples to enhance their understanding. We discussed several examples and i asked to children to give me examples of their own until I was confident that they had understood.

c) By observing the pupils learning and answers to the questions during the lesson, I can gain information and make judgements about their participation, understanding and the progress they are making. I ensure that pupils fully understand the learning objective or individual targets that they have so that they are also able to assess their own progress whilst working.
If pupils do not understand the learning objective, I explain to them on how it can be achieved. I listen to the pupils describe their work and their reasoning

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Prior to the lesson, I will have a discussion with the class teacher about the lesson and WILF. The teacher will often have a group of lower/higher ability pupils who I will take out of the classroom for either further support or further challenges. If there are a group of children who require support, I will usually take them out for pre-teaching before the lesson begins. I use clear examples and simple language to not confuse the pupils and to promote understanding.

b) Pupils who have additional needs will have an individual or personalised learning plan and will be familiar with their personal targets.
During a lesson on place value I noticed that a child was completely unaware of how to round to the nearest 10 and 100. She found it difficult to count forwards and backwards in 10’s and 100’s fluently and required plenty of support in doing so. I discussed this with the child and emphasised the importance of being able to add 10 and 100 to any given number to meet the success criteria.

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The feedback I provide to my teacher is usually oral feedback and written feedback as notes on intervention sheets. During my time in the classroom with the child(ren), I observe their participation and whether they have made any progress in the learning activities. If I feel that little or no progress has been made, I communicate this to the teacher, so we can support the pupil with further consolidation activities or 1:1 support to improve the quality of work and understanding.
I ensure that the feedback is given in a timely manner and is sensitive to the individual needs of the pupil. For example, I had been carrying out daily reading with a pupil and she didn’t seem to be making any progress. I expressed my concerns to the teacher, who then implemented further strategies to enhance the pupils reading ability. We have implemented strategies to enhance phonological awareness and have been using different texts to see how many words she can read per minute to promote speed. I have also model read for the pupil to promote expression and comprehension. I found that because her reading was so slow and mechanical, she wasn’t comprehending the text.
Additionally, I make notes in the children’s reading diaries in relation to their reading. This can be notes about encouraging them to read more at home to develop and enhance fluency or words that they struggled with during reading, so they can practice them at home.
I also make notes in the margins of children’s work to provide them with feedback on their task they have completed. This is usually a short comment praising them for excellent work or further questioning to test their understanding.
The feedback which I provide to the teacher doesn’t just consider the academic needs, but also the social and emotional needs of the child.

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After the objectives of the lesson have been explained and the children have been instructed to begin their task/activity, I then begin to circulate around the classroom to check for understanding and ensure that all pupils are clear about what is expected from them. Through observation the learners, I can identify immediately which pupils have the grasped the concept and which pupils require further support. To fully support pupils to the best of my ability, I need to make sure that I am aware myself of the learning objectives so I can explain them further to the pupil using more clear and simple language if required.
As some activities require children to tick off a challenge card, I ensure that all children are working in line with meeting their challenges. If I see that a pupil is slightly drifting off task, I make them aware of what is required from them to help them stay on course.
For example, during an English lesson, pupils had to include an embedded relative clause in their writing. Some pupils hadn’t added this into their sentence because they were still confused about what this was, so I supported them by giving them examples and then allowing them to come up with their own ideas. When writing with including subordinating conjunctions in the sentences I would ask the children to give me an example of a sentence with a subordinate clause and a main clause. I would then ask the pupil to see if the sentence makes sense if they switch the sentence around. If it does, then clearly the pupil has understood what they are supposed to.
During another English lesson, where pupils had to draft a formal letter, I used questions such as what is the purpose of the letter, or what point are you trying to make in the letter. This was so I could establish whether pupils had a clear understanding of what was expected from them. I then listen to what inferences the children make based upon their understanding which then allows me to determine their level of understanding. If they were unable to tell me what I asked I would then explain the task again ensuring that the language I use is simple and clear and aim to put them on to the right track. We can’t expect children to grasp the concept immediately as all children have different levels of ability and understanding, however, by explaining the task in a way that suits their ability, we can ensure that learning and understanding will eventually take place.
I aim to point out any strengths and weaknesses that I have identified and provide constructive feedback on pupil’s work so that I can allow the pupil to reflect upon my feedback, correct any mistakes and develop on any areas of weakness. If a pupil has produced outstanding or extremely neat work, I ensure that the child is commended for this and gets recognition for it in the class. This is an effective way to keeping pupils motivated and boost their confidence.

At the end of the lesson, the teacher will usually give the children a quiz to test how successful understanding has been. An incentive will be given to children who answer questions correctly.

When marking pupils work, the teacher will be able to understand the success of the lesson. If we find that some pupils have struggled to grasp the concept, I will then either take the children in small groups or on a one to one basis and reinforce what has been taught. I will usually use different teaching aids such as the whiteboard or additional materials to teach the pupils. I tend to be careful about my questioning techniques as I want to challenge the pupils and aim to develop their thinking skills. However, I don’t want to push them too hard and leave then with a negative attitude towards their work. I like to ensure that I am testing their existing knowledge and understanding of the task only pushing them to a limit that I think they will feel comfortable with.

With Year 4 pupils we have been learning to tell the time to the nearest five minutes and the nearest minute.
We started off by looking at the nearest five minutes.
Most children eventually grasped the concept, however, teaching and learning time can be extremely tricky. There were some lower ability pupils who required a lot of support. When the teacher had finished teaching the lesson, all children were given a worksheet which required them to write down in words the time shown on an analogue clock. For example, if the time shown on the analogue clock showed the hour hand on the 3 and the minute hand on the 6, the pupils should have written half past three. During the lesson, I listen to, observe and engage with the children I am assessing. I use strategies of questioning to test their understanding. For example, I will ask, if the hour hand is on the 4 and the minute hand is on the 5, what time is it?

Show how you have used assessment strategies to promote learning in your setting.

After the objectives of the lesson have been explained and the children have been instructed to begin their task/activity, I then begin to circulate around the classroom to check for understanding and ensure that all pupils are clear about what is expected from them. Through observation the learners, I can identify immediately which pupils have the grasped the concept and which pupils require further support. To fully support pupils to the best of my ability, I need to make sure that I am aware myself of the learning objectives so I can explain them further to the pupil using more clear and simple language if required.
As some activities require children to tick off a challenge card, I ensure that all children are working in line with meeting their challenges. If I see that a pupil is off task, I make them aware of what is required from them to help them stay on course.
For example, during an English lesson, pupils had to include a relative clause in their writing. Some pupils hadn’t added this into their sentence because they were still confused about what this was, so I supported them by giving them examples and then allowing them to come up with their own ideas. When writing with including subordinating conjunctions in the sentences I would ask the children to give me an example of a sentence with a subordinate clause and a main clause. I would then ask the pupil to see if the sentence makes sense if they switch the sentence around. If it does, then clearly the pupil has understood what they are supposed to.
During another English lesson, where pupils had to draft a formal letter, I used questions such as what is the purpose of the letter, or what point are you trying to make in the letter. This was so I could establish whether pupils had a clear understanding of what was expected from them. I then listen to what inferences the children make based upon their understanding which then allows me to determine their level of understanding. If they were unable to tell me what I asked I would then explain the task again ensuring that the language I use is simple and clear and aim to put them on to the right track. We can’t expect children to grasp the concept immediately as all children have different levels of ability and understanding, however, by explaining the task in a way that suits their ability, we can ensure that learning and understanding will eventually take place.
I aim to point out any strengths and weaknesses that I have identified and provide constructive feedback on pupil’s work so that I can allow the pupil to reflect upon my feedback, correct any mistakes and develop on any areas of weakness. If a pupil has produced outstanding or extremely neat work, I ensure that the child is commended for this and gets recognition for it in the class. This is an effective way to keeping pupils motivated and boost their confidence.

At the end of the lesson, the teacher will usually give the children a quiz to test how successful understanding has been. An incentive will be given to children who answer questions correctly.

When marking pupils work, the teacher will be able to understand the success of the lesson. If we find that some pupils have struggled to grasp the concept, I will then either take the children in small groups or on a one to one basis and reinforce what has been taught. I will usually use different teaching aids such as the whiteboard or additional materials to teach the pupils. I tend to be careful about my questioning techniques as I want to challenge the pupils and aim to develop their thinking skills. However, I don’t want to push them too hard and leave then with a negative attitude towards their work. I like to ensure that I am testing their existing knowledge and understanding of the task only pushing them to a limit that I think they will feel comfortable with.

With Year 4 pupils we have been learning to tell the time to the nearest five minutes and the nearest minute.
We started off by looking at the nearest five minutes.
Most children eventually grasped the concept, however, teaching and learning time can be extremely tricky. There were some lower ability pupils who required a lot of support. When the teacher had finished teaching the lesson, all children were given a worksheet which required them to write down in words the time shown on an analogue clock. For example, if the time shown on the analogue clock showed the hour hand on the 3 and the minute hand on the 6, the pupils should have written half past three. During the lesson, I listen to, observe and engage with the children I am assessing. I use strategies of questioning to test their understanding. For example, I will ask, if the hour hand is on the 4 and the minute hand is on the 5, what time is it?

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